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Boelcke Heating and Air Conditioning

Boelcke Heating and Air Conditioning logo
153 E. St. Joseph St. , Coloma- 49038
Missouri , United States  United States

Today (Saturday) Open 8:00 AM to 12:00 PM

Boelcke Heating and Air Conditioning - Coloma

Boelcke Heating and Air Conditioning is a customer-focused heating and air-conditioning business that was established in 1963. Located in Stevensville and Coloma, MI we use highly-trained people whose goal is make our company the most effective service company in Southwest Michigan.

Our business focuses primarily on designing, engineering, and installing complete convenience systems for owners of current houses and structures the same as yours. We just take special pride in the craftsmen we train and employ--a fact you are going to notice straight away within the attitude and integrity they bring to your job site. Our entire company works to make your experience hassle-free and enjoyable. Should we make an error, we shall do everything within our capacity to correct it to your satisfaction.

From the professionalism of our product sales designers, towards the dedication of our field workers, we're specialized in delivering you top. We pledge to always inform you the exact cost of the service before starting our work. We follow this philosophy with our exclusive written guarantee when choosing Boelcke Heating and Air Conditioning to contract your work:

“If you are not 100% satisfied with our product or service, we assure you that within 30 days of your request we’ll happily refund the total amount removing the equipment”. You can compare our guarantee with other companies as others will typically guarantee only the functionality regarding the equipment--not your satisfaction with the procedure or your finished job lives as much as your objectives. For this reason Boelcke Heating and Air Conditioning continues growing with increased satisfied customers every year. Call (269) 429 9261 for further queries.

Business Operation Hours
Monday 7:30 AM to 5:00 PM
Tuesday 7:30 AM to 5:00 PM
Wednesday 7:30 AM to 5:00 PM
Thursday 7:30 AM to 5:00 PM
Friday 7:30 AM to 5:00 PM
Saturday 8:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Sunday Closed

Other Services : Heating Maintenance, AC Maintenance, Furnace Repair

Service Type : Yes, this business serves customers at their Location

Product and Services

Most heating and cooling systems still use a basic air filter. These filters were originally designed to protect the equipment and not the people served by the equipment. The average air filter is only capable of removing 3–5% of the particles that pass through it. Today, however, there are several types of permanent air filters available in various efficiencies that can help you filter the air in your home. If you suffer from allergies, asthma, hay fever or other breathing difficulties, there is an air filter that can help you. We can even provide you with the same type of air filter used in hospital operating rooms.
Imagine if every time you turned on a light switch, every electrical device in your home came on or if every time you went to wash your hands every faucet, shower, tub and toilet opened up. That would be crazy! So why is it that when you need heating in one room the entire house heats up? Now you can zone your heating and cooling so that you don’t have to heat or cool your entire home when you don’t need to.
Our home zoning system is specially designed to allow your entire family to be comfortable, regardless of where they are in your home. Now you can divide your home’s ductwork into specific zones that can be controlled independently, whether heating or cooling. Imagine the bedrooms on one zone, the family room on another, and the kitchen on a third. Even better yet, you can finally control that hard to heat and cool addition for which you paid a fortune.
Learn more about how ARZEL ZONING can give you the comfort you've always dreamed of!
Central air conditioners circulate cool air through a system of supply and return ducts. Supply ducts and registers (i.e., openings in the walls, floors, or ceilings covered by grills) carry cooled air from the air conditioner to the home. This cooled air becomes warmer as it circulates through the home; then it flows back to the central air conditioner through return ducts and registers.
Air conditioners help to dehumidify the incoming air, but in extremely humid climates or in cases where the air conditioner is oversized, it may not achieve a low humidity. Running a dehumidifier in your air conditioned home will increase your energy use, both for the dehumidifier itself and because the air conditioner will require more energy to cool your house. A preferable alternative is a dehumidifying heat pipe, which can be added as a retrofit to most existing systems.

Additional Information

To understand why many of today’s health problems can be caused by the home you live in, you needto look back a few years to see what caused this to happen. You see, during the energy crisis of the early 1970s, highly insulated “tight” homes became popular because of their potential to reduce energy costs. Within a few years, however, complaints started to arise, due to health, and excessive moisture issues caused by indoor pollution, and associated moisture problems within these homes.
In the late 1980s and early 90s, indoor air quality became a nationally recognized issue. Even today, newer and more energy-efficient homes seemed predisposed to the problem. In addition, they retain more humidity and airborne pollutants, which causes longer life-spans, and more productive cycles of microbial activity within the home, such as mold, germs, bacteria and viruses. This greater activity and concentration of these airborne contaminants, equates to more allergic reactions, and sickness within families, for longer periods of time.
Why is mold so difficult to control? Mold is at the bottom of the food chain. It thrives on very little, grows rapidly, and produces spores, volatile organic com-pounds, and other toxins. One organism can multiply to trillions in less than three weeks. When given the right conditions, mold can occur anywhere; in homes, schools, workplaces, entertainment centers, vehicles, etc. The interior of your ductwork and air conditioning equipment, provides an ideal environment for mold growth — especially in the air conditioners inside drain-pan where it is dark, damp, and filled with nutrients. The result can be like blowing air over a swamp or through a sewer and then into your home, vehicle, and workplace.
 According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 60% of Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) problems and allergies may be mold-related. Some IAQ diagnosticians and practitioners today say the figure may be as high as 80%. The increased usage of air conditioning systems almost directly parallels the increase of allergies and IAQ problems.
As mold and bacteria grow on coils and in drain pans, they are disseminated through the ducts to occupied spaces. Some mold products (toxins) produce serious and sometimes life-threatening reactions, including allergy, asthma, hypersensitivity, pneumonitis, and in some extreme cases even bleeding lung disease. Additionally, mold creates a troublesome maintenance problem. Its activity results in dirty coils, a loss of air-flow, loss of heat exchange efficiency, dirty and sometimes plugged drain pans, and excessive energy use.
Our company has found that the most successful way to handle system mold is through Ultraviolet (U.V.) germicidal lights. These U.V. systems are a recent breakthrough in protecting the health of a home. Ultraviolet light in the “C" band (UVC) has been used for more than 65 years to kill microorganisms in hospitals, barber shops, laboratories, pharmaceutical plants, and at the nation's Center for Disease Control. Residential ultraviolet units have been independently tested and proved to be effective in the constantly moving air environments of heating and cooling systems, killing mold and bacteria quickly and effectively. The UVC energy attacks the organism’s DNA and either destroys it immediately or prevents it from reproducing. For most people, the original motivation for installing the lights is to abate IAQ complaints and/or allergies. However, they are also pleased to learn that many hidden odors are also eliminated with U.V. technology.
A central air conditioner is either a split-system unit or a packaged unit. In a split-system central air conditioner, an outdoor metal cabinet contains the condenser and compressor, and an indoor cabinet contains the evaporator. In many split-system air conditioners, this indoor cabinet also contains a furnace or the indoor part of a heat pump. The air conditioner's evaporator coil is installed in the cabinet or main supply duct of this furnace or heat pump. If your home already has a furnace but no air conditioner, a split-system is the most economical central air conditioner to install.
In a packaged central air conditioner, the evaporator, condenser, and compressor are all located in one cabinet, which usually is placed on a roof or on a concrete slab next to the house's foundation. This type of air conditioner also is used in small commercial buildings. Air supply and return ducts come from indoors through the home's exterior wall or roof to connect with the packaged air conditioner, which is usually located outdoors. Packaged air conditioners often include electric heating coils or a natural gas furnace. This combination of air conditioner and central heater eliminates the need for a separate furnace indoors.
Central air conditioners are more efficient than room air conditioners. In addition, they are out of the way, quiet, and convenient to operate. To save energy and money, you should try to buy an energy-efficient air conditioner and reduce your central air conditioner's energy use. In an average air-conditioned home, air conditioning consumes more than 2,000 kilowatt-hours of electricity per year, causing power plants to emit about 3,500 pounds of carbon dioxide and 31 pounds of sulfur dioxide. If you are considering adding central air conditioning to your home, the deciding factor may be the need for ductwork.
If you have an older central air conditioner, you might choose to replace the outdoor compressor with a modern, high-efficiency unit. If you do so, consult a local heating and cooling contractor to assure that the new compressor is properly matched to the indoor unit. However, considering recent changes in refrigerants and air conditioning designs, it might be wiser to replace the entire system. Today's best air conditioners use 30% to 50% less energy to produce the same amount of cooling as air conditioners made in the mid 1970s. Even if your air conditioner is only 10 years old, you may save 20% to 40% of your cooling energy costs by replacing it with a newer, more efficient model.
Proper sizing and installation are key elements in determining air conditioner efficiency. Too large a unit will not adequately remove humidity. Too small a unit will not be able to attain a comfortable temperature on the hottest days. Improper unit location, lack of insulation, and improper duct installation can greatly diminish efficiency. When buying an air conditioner, look for a model with a high efficiency. Central air conditioners are rated according to their seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER). SEER indicates the relative amount of energy needed to provide a specific cooling output. Many older systems have SEER ratings of 6 or less. The minimum SEER allowed today is 13. Look for the ENERGY STAR® label for central air conditioners with SEER ratings of 13 or greater, but consider using air conditioning equipment with higher SEER ratings for greater savings.
New residential central air conditioner standards went into effect on January 23, 2006. Air conditioners manufactured after January 26, 2006 must achieve a SEER of 13 or higher. SEER 13 is 30% more efficient than the previous minimum SEER of 10. The standard applies only to appliances manufactured after January 23, 2006. Equipment with a rating less than SEER 13 manufactured before this date may still be sold and installed. The average homeowner will remain unaffected by this standard change for some time to come. The standards do not require you to change your existing central air conditioning units, and replacement parts and services should still be available for your home's systems. The "lifespan" of a central air conditioner is about 15 to 20 years. Manufacturers typically continue to support existing equipment by making replacement parts available and honoring maintenance contracts after the new standard goes into effect.

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